Posts tagged Alaska

International Ship Pollution Rules Opposed By Alaska
Alaska has sued to block enforcement of rules intended to limit pollution from large ships, saying the rules will result in higher freight rates and pricier cruises that will hurt the state’s economy.
New rules set to take effect Aug. 1 will require that cargo carriers and cruise ships use a low-sulfur fuel within 200 miles of U.S. and Canadian shores. While the rules, initiated by the U.S. and agreed to by dozens of other nations as part of an international treaty, affect much of the North American coast and Hawaii, officials in Alaska say they will have a disproportionate effect on the state and want to keep them from being enforced in waters off Alaska’s coast.
About 90 percent of the commodities entering Alaska are delivered through a single port — the Port of Anchorage — and many southeast Alaska communities rely heavily on revenues from the cruise trade to survive. The state, relying on industry estimates, said the rules could increase shipping costs to the state by 8 percent and cruise passenger costs up to $18 a day, potentially leading to a 15 percent decline in visitors. 

International Ship Pollution Rules Opposed By Alaska

Alaska has sued to block enforcement of rules intended to limit pollution from large ships, saying the rules will result in higher freight rates and pricier cruises that will hurt the state’s economy.

New rules set to take effect Aug. 1 will require that cargo carriers and cruise ships use a low-sulfur fuel within 200 miles of U.S. and Canadian shores. While the rules, initiated by the U.S. and agreed to by dozens of other nations as part of an international treaty, affect much of the North American coast and Hawaii, officials in Alaska say they will have a disproportionate effect on the state and want to keep them from being enforced in waters off Alaska’s coast.

About 90 percent of the commodities entering Alaska are delivered through a single port — the Port of Anchorage — and many southeast Alaska communities rely heavily on revenues from the cruise trade to survive. The state, relying on industry estimates, said the rules could increase shipping costs to the state by 8 percent and cruise passenger costs up to $18 a day, potentially leading to a 15 percent decline in visitors. 

Shell Loses Control Of Arctic Drilling Rig In Alaskan Harbor
Royal Dutch Shell’s preparedness to drill offshore in the harsh and remote Arctic Ocean this summer has been called into question by a series of recent events.
Over the weekend, the company’s drilling rig, the Noble Discoverer, appears to have come dangerously close to running aground near Dutch Harbor, where Shell’s fleet has been assembled. The Noble Discoverer is one of two dozen ships Shell plans to send into some of the most challenging conditions on the planet. According to the US Coast Guard, the vessel slipped anchor and drifted within 100 yards off shore before being pulled back into deeper water by a Shell tugboat.
The incident immediately follows the Coast Guard’s refusal to certify Shell’s oil spill response barge, the Arctic Challenger, because of concerns about the fire protection system, wiring, and piping on the 37 year-old vessel. The Coast Guard also expressed doubts about the barge’s ability to withstand harsh Arctic storms. The containment barge is essential to the fleet as it is designed to deliver oil spill response equipment to the five drilling sites. Without it, Shell would not have access to the equipment necessary to contain an oil spill in the Arctic Ocean. The fact that the company is experiencing problems with this equipment before even reaching the drill sites raises serious concerns about their contingency plan.

Shell Loses Control Of Arctic Drilling Rig In Alaskan Harbor

Royal Dutch Shell’s preparedness to drill offshore in the harsh and remote Arctic Ocean this summer has been called into question by a series of recent events.

Over the weekend, the company’s drilling rig, the Noble Discoverer, appears to have come dangerously close to running aground near Dutch Harbor, where Shell’s fleet has been assembled. The Noble Discoverer is one of two dozen ships Shell plans to send into some of the most challenging conditions on the planet. According to the US Coast Guard, the vessel slipped anchor and drifted within 100 yards off shore before being pulled back into deeper water by a Shell tugboat.

The incident immediately follows the Coast Guard’s refusal to certify Shell’s oil spill response barge, the Arctic Challenger, because of concerns about the fire protection system, wiring, and piping on the 37 year-old vessel. The Coast Guard also expressed doubts about the barge’s ability to withstand harsh Arctic storms. The containment barge is essential to the fleet as it is designed to deliver oil spill response equipment to the five drilling sites. Without it, Shell would not have access to the equipment necessary to contain an oil spill in the Arctic Ocean. The fact that the company is experiencing problems with this equipment before even reaching the drill sites raises serious concerns about their contingency plan.

Animated “Fast Draw” video explaining the Alaska Budget process.

Parnell says ‘no’ to an Alaska-run health insurance exchange
So, in other words, Alaska State Governor Sean Parnell wants Obama & the Federal government to create health insurance exchange for the state.
Because when it comes to preaching small government and states’ rights, the best example Parnell can demonstrate is to let the federal government run state programs I guess.
Hypocrite much?

Parnell says ‘no’ to an Alaska-run health insurance exchange

So, in other words, Alaska State Governor Sean Parnell wants Obama & the Federal government to create health insurance exchange for the state.

Because when it comes to preaching small government and states’ rights, the best example Parnell can demonstrate is to let the federal government run state programs I guess.

Hypocrite much?

thedailywhat:

Inspirational Motivational of the Day: 25-year-old Dallas Seavey has become the youngest person ever to win the Iditarod Sled Dog Race, crossing the finish line in Nome, Alaska, a week and a half after leaving the starting point in Anchorage.
His win entitles him to $50,400 and a brand new Dodge truck.
Seavey, a USA Wrestling champ who comes from a proud line of Iditarod mushers — his father, Mitch Seavey won in 2004 — took control of the race midway through.
Ally Zirkle, 41, who had been leading until then, will finish second. Ramey Smyth is expected to finish third.
The so-called “Last Great Race on Earth” was started in 1973, and covers a stretch of about 1,000 miles which generally takes mushers and their team of dogs between 10 to 17 days to complete. Last year’s winner, John Baker, set a course record by completed the Iditarod in 8 days and 19 hours.
[newstrib / photo: jjkeller.]

thedailywhat:

Inspirational Motivational of the Day: 25-year-old Dallas Seavey has become the youngest person ever to win the Iditarod Sled Dog Race, crossing the finish line in Nome, Alaska, a week and a half after leaving the starting point in Anchorage.

His win entitles him to $50,400 and a brand new Dodge truck.

Seavey, a USA Wrestling champ who comes from a proud line of Iditarod mushers — his father, Mitch Seavey won in 2004 — took control of the race midway through.

Ally Zirkle, 41, who had been leading until then, will finish second. Ramey Smyth is expected to finish third.

The so-called “Last Great Race on Earth” was started in 1973, and covers a stretch of about 1,000 miles which generally takes mushers and their team of dogs between 10 to 17 days to complete. Last year’s winner, John Baker, set a course record by completed the Iditarod in 8 days and 19 hours.

[newstrib / photo: jjkeller.]

On Aug. 2, 2006, a man walked into Rayco Sales gun shop in Juneau and asked to look at a .22 caliber rifle. The store owner, Ray Coxe, and the man examined and talked about the gun together, and Coxe gave the man a quote — $195.
The man didn’t buy the gun and picked up his backpack as if to leave the store. When Coxe walked into the back of the store, the man, later identified as Jason Coday, took the rifle and left two $100 bills on the counter.
Two days later, the man used the rifle to murder a 26-year-old man working at the Juneau Fred Meyer whom he had never met before in an unprovoked attack. It was Juneau’s first murder in five years.
Jonathan Lowy with the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence in Washington, D.C., who is co-counsel with Mark Choate on behalf of the family of the murdered Simone Young Kim, argued that Coxe sells guns off the books then later claims that they are missing. Lowy said a previous audit of Rayco Sales found 200 guns missing from the inventory.
“To put that in context, 90 percent of gun dealers have zero guns missing from inventory,” Lowy said. “ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives), they looked at the worst of the worst as far as gun dealers in this country. Out of 800,000 gun dealers, they found 16 in the entire nation who had that sort of total.”

On Aug. 2, 2006, a man walked into Rayco Sales gun shop in Juneau and asked to look at a .22 caliber rifle. The store owner, Ray Coxe, and the man examined and talked about the gun together, and Coxe gave the man a quote — $195.

The man didn’t buy the gun and picked up his backpack as if to leave the store. When Coxe walked into the back of the store, the man, later identified as Jason Coday, took the rifle and left two $100 bills on the counter.

Two days later, the man used the rifle to murder a 26-year-old man working at the Juneau Fred Meyer whom he had never met before in an unprovoked attack. It was Juneau’s first murder in five years.

Jonathan Lowy with the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence in Washington, D.C., who is co-counsel with Mark Choate on behalf of the family of the murdered Simone Young Kim, argued that Coxe sells guns off the books then later claims that they are missing. Lowy said a previous audit of Rayco Sales found 200 guns missing from the inventory.

“To put that in context, 90 percent of gun dealers have zero guns missing from inventory,” Lowy said. “ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives), they looked at the worst of the worst as far as gun dealers in this country. Out of 800,000 gun dealers, they found 16 in the entire nation who had that sort of total.”

Alaskans-Preserve You’re Choice in Health Care Providers!

In an unprecedented overreach by Alaska’s Division of Professional Licensing (DPL), medical suppliers in Alaska and the lower 48 have been told not to sell  anything that is restricted by the prescription  (Rx) legend to Naturopathic Doctors in Alaska.  This includes such things as injectable vitamins and many restricted herbs that are the mainstay of Naturopathic Medicine.  This would make Alaska by far the most limited state of any of the licensed states in the US.

House Bill 266  and Senate Bill 175 (HB266  & SB175) would fix this problem so that as Naturopathic Doctors we can continue to serve our communities as we have for the past 18 years.  It is not an expansion of our scope of practice.  It merely enshrines the status quo.  This bill takes one sentence from our regulations (medicines derived from or a concentrate or extract of  a plant, tree, root, moss, fungus or other natural substance) and places it into our licensing law so that thousands of Naturopathic families can continue to receive the same level of care they have come to expect from our providers.

More than a year ago, “On the Ice” — Barrow filmmaker Andrew Okpeaha MacLean’s Alaska-filmed tale of tragedy in the far north — debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Since then, the film has been shown across the U.S. and the world, making rounds on the festival circuit. But it never saw a theatrical release.

All that will change this Friday, when “On the Ice” appears in Fairbanks, Anchorage and New York City theaters, and also premiering at the Gold Town Nickelodeon in Juneau next Wednesday.

Ask Juneau residents who live near the Mendenhall River and they’ll likely be able to tell you exactly where they were the day billions of gallons of glacial melt water flooded their neighborhoods last year.

Ask Juneau residents who live near the Mendenhall River and they’ll likely be able to tell you exactly where they were the day billions of gallons of glacial melt water flooded their neighborhoods last year.