Posts tagged France

Final Jeopardy – Category is OBAMA: The answer is: Fundraising in Paris
Ben Shapiro: How will Obama be spending American Independence Day this week?

Apparently tiring of US soil as a source of campaign dollars, the Obama campaign is headed overseas — with its celebrity friends in tow. The European Obama campaign starts next week in Paris on July 4 with a reception organized by various fundraising heavy-hitters. Independence Day fundraisers in Paris – now that’s a flag-waving campaign.

History 101: France & the American Revolution
Up against the British power, the young United States lacked arms and allies, and so turned towards France. France was not directly interested in the conflict, but saw it as an opportunity to contest British power by supporting a new British opponent. Through negotiations conducted first by Silas Deane and then Benjamin Franklin, France engaged first in covert support of the American cause.
At first France just sold gunpowder and ammunition to the Americans. This aid, much of which passed through the neutral Dutch West Indies port of Saint Eustatius undetected, contributed to George Washington’s survival against the British onslaught in 1776 and 1777, and was a major factor in the defeat of General Burgoyne’s expedition down the Champlain corridor that ended in a British disaster at Saratoga. French ports accommodated American ships, including privateers and Continental Navy warships, that acted against British merchant ships. France provided significant economic aid, either as donations or loans, and also offered technical assistance, granting some of its military strategists “vacations”, so they could assist American troops.
France formally recognized the United States on February 6, 1778, with the signing of the Treaty of Alliance. War followed not long after, when Britain declared war on France on March 17, 1778. The British naval force, then the largest fleet afloat, and French fleet confronted each other from the beginning. The British avoided intercepting a French fleet that left Toulon under the comte d’Estaing in April for North America, fearing the French fleet at Brest might then be used to launch an invasion of Britain. France had kept the Brest fleet to protect commercial shipping in European waters, and it sailed out only after a British fleet was confirmed to have left in pursuit of d’Estaing, thus weakening the British Channel fleet.
By 1781, with the war dragging on, The French West Indies fleet commanded by the comte De Grasse reached the Chesapeake Bay at the end of August while French and American soldiers marched on Virginia, led by Marquis De Lafayette, which succeeded in defending Charles Cornwallis’s attempt to occupy Yorktown. The arrival of another British fleet sent to dispute de Grasse’s control of the Chesapeake was defeated on September 5 at the Battle of the Chesapeake, and the Newport fleet delivered the French siege to complete the allied military victory. The Siege of Yorktown and following surrender by Cornwallis on October 19 were decisive in ending major hostilities in North America.
Great Britian formally recognized the independence of the United States of America in the 1783 Treaty of Paris.
So, basically, if any country should ever be visited by an American president on Independence Day, it should, and forever be, France. But I’m sure Obama won’t be mentioning any of the above historical events as he’ll be too busy apologizing for something.

Final Jeopardy – Category is OBAMA: The answer is: Fundraising in Paris

Ben Shapiro: How will Obama be spending American Independence Day this week?

Apparently tiring of US soil as a source of campaign dollars, the Obama campaign is headed overseas — with its celebrity friends in tow. The European Obama campaign starts next week in Paris on July 4 with a reception organized by various fundraising heavy-hitters. Independence Day fundraisers in Paris – now that’s a flag-waving campaign.

History 101: France & the American Revolution

Up against the British power, the young United States lacked arms and allies, and so turned towards France. France was not directly interested in the conflict, but saw it as an opportunity to contest British power by supporting a new British opponent. Through negotiations conducted first by Silas Deane and then Benjamin Franklin, France engaged first in covert support of the American cause.

At first France just sold gunpowder and ammunition to the Americans. This aid, much of which passed through the neutral Dutch West Indies port of Saint Eustatius undetected, contributed to George Washington’s survival against the British onslaught in 1776 and 1777, and was a major factor in the defeat of General Burgoyne’s expedition down the Champlain corridor that ended in a British disaster at Saratoga. French ports accommodated American ships, including privateers and Continental Navy warships, that acted against British merchant ships. France provided significant economic aid, either as donations or loans, and also offered technical assistance, granting some of its military strategists “vacations”, so they could assist American troops.

France formally recognized the United States on February 6, 1778, with the signing of the Treaty of Alliance. War followed not long after, when Britain declared war on France on March 17, 1778. The British naval force, then the largest fleet afloat, and French fleet confronted each other from the beginning. The British avoided intercepting a French fleet that left Toulon under the comte d’Estaing in April for North America, fearing the French fleet at Brest might then be used to launch an invasion of Britain. France had kept the Brest fleet to protect commercial shipping in European waters, and it sailed out only after a British fleet was confirmed to have left in pursuit of d’Estaing, thus weakening the British Channel fleet.

By 1781, with the war dragging on, The French West Indies fleet commanded by the comte De Grasse reached the Chesapeake Bay at the end of August while French and American soldiers marched on Virginia, led by Marquis De Lafayette, which succeeded in defending Charles Cornwallis’s attempt to occupy Yorktown. The arrival of another British fleet sent to dispute de Grasse’s control of the Chesapeake was defeated on September 5 at the Battle of the Chesapeake, and the Newport fleet delivered the French siege to complete the allied military victory. The Siege of Yorktown and following surrender by Cornwallis on October 19 were decisive in ending major hostilities in North America.

Great Britian formally recognized the independence of the United States of America in the 1783 Treaty of Paris.

So, basically, if any country should ever be visited by an American president on Independence Day, it should, and forever be, France. But I’m sure Obama won’t be mentioning any of the above historical events as he’ll be too busy apologizing for something.