Posts tagged job growth

“GET A JOB”: Dialogue Between a Conservative Congressman and a Voter on the Minimum Wage

VOTER TO REP. C.W. BILL YOUNG (R-FLA.): Jesse Jackson Jr. is passing around a bill to increase the minimum wage to $10 an hour. Would you support that?

REP. YOUNG: “Probably not.”

VOTER: “It’s $10 bucks an hour. It would give us a living wage.”

YOUNG: “How about getting a job. Why do you want that benefit? Get a job.”

VOTER: “I have a job, but it’s not enough to get by on.”

[YOUNG WALKS AWAY]

Romney says “Americans should only look at his last year as governor.” Even by his own standard, Romney falls short: weaker job growth in Romney’s last 12 months in MA than Obama’s most recent 12 months.

Romney says “Americans should only look at his last year as governor.” Even by his own standard, Romney falls short: weaker job growth in Romney’s last 12 months in MA than Obama’s most recent 12 months.

Congressional Budget Office: The Stimulus Worked
The director of the nonpartisan (and widely respected) Congressional Budget Office, Douglas Elmendorf gave testimony in response to questions from Rep. Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.), a member of the tea party caucus. Huelskamp asserted that the stimulus was a failure because it did not keep the jobless rate below 8 percent, as the Obama administration predicted.
“Where did Washington mess up?” Huelskamp demanded. “Because you’re saying most economists think it should’ve worked. It didn’t.”
Most economists not only think it should have worked; they think it did work, Elmendorf replied. 80 percent of economic experts agreed that, because of the stimulus, the U.S. unemployment rate was lower at the end of 2010 than it would have been otherwise. Only 4% disagree. The CBO’s own analysis found that the package added as many as 3.3 million jobs to the economy during the second quarter of 2010, and may have prevented the nation from lapsing back into recession.

Congressional Budget Office: The Stimulus Worked

The director of the nonpartisan (and widely respected) Congressional Budget Office, Douglas Elmendorf gave testimony in response to questions from Rep. Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.), a member of the tea party caucus. Huelskamp asserted that the stimulus was a failure because it did not keep the jobless rate below 8 percent, as the Obama administration predicted.

“Where did Washington mess up?” Huelskamp demanded. “Because you’re saying most economists think it should’ve worked. It didn’t.”

Most economists not only think it should have worked; they think it did work, Elmendorf replied. 80 percent of economic experts agreed that, because of the stimulus, the U.S. unemployment rate was lower at the end of 2010 than it would have been otherwise. Only 4% disagree. The CBO’s own analysis found that the package added as many as 3.3 million jobs to the economy during the second quarter of 2010, and may have prevented the nation from lapsing back into recession.

Wisconsin’s Economic Recovery Under Walker Lags Behind Country. Dead last of all the states.
And if graphs aren’t your thing, Obama is in green and Walker is in red. Wisconsin has the worst record in the nation for job growth. If you look at the jobs picture since Walker took office, Wisconsin has lost a net 14,200 jobs. In fact, Walker’s record is currently worse than Romney’s 47th out of 50 as gov of MA. While Wisconsin has lost jobs during Walker’s time in office, the country as a whole saw jobs increase by 1.8 percent. Needless to say, Wisconsin is not on track for Walker to keep his campaign promise to bring the state 250,000 new jobs by 2015. As the Greater Wisconsin Political Fund correctly pointed out in a recent ad, in 2011, “Wisconsin lost more jobs than any other state. Dead last.”

Wisconsin’s Economic Recovery Under Walker Lags Behind Country. Dead last of all the states.

And if graphs aren’t your thing, Obama is in green and Walker is in red. Wisconsin has the worst record in the nation for job growth. If you look at the jobs picture since Walker took office, Wisconsin has lost a net 14,200 jobs. In fact, Walker’s record is currently worse than Romney’s 47th out of 50 as gov of MA. While Wisconsin has lost jobs during Walker’s time in office, the country as a whole saw jobs increase by 1.8 percent. Needless to say, Wisconsin is not on track for Walker to keep his campaign promise to bring the state 250,000 new jobs by 2015. As the Greater Wisconsin Political Fund correctly pointed out in a recent ad, in 2011, “Wisconsin lost more jobs than any other state. Dead last.”

Just call him Mr. 47 Out of 50.

Just call him Mr. 47 Out of 50.

If Republicans had not blocked further aid to state and local governments and insisted on deep spending cuts, it’s almost certain that hundreds of thousands of public workers would still be gainfully employed and helping to fuel a strong recovery thanks to their own personal consumption. Instead, the 647,000 public sector jobs lost since August 2008 continue to provide a drag on the overall economy, in addition of course to creating untold hardship for those who lost their jobs.
(In case you’re wondering, that spike in public sector employment was due to the hiring of temporary census workers in 2010.)

If Republicans had not blocked further aid to state and local governments and insisted on deep spending cuts, it’s almost certain that hundreds of thousands of public workers would still be gainfully employed and helping to fuel a strong recovery thanks to their own personal consumption. Instead, the 647,000 public sector jobs lost since August 2008 continue to provide a drag on the overall economy, in addition of course to creating untold hardship for those who lost their jobs.

(In case you’re wondering, that spike in public sector employment was due to the hiring of temporary census workers in 2010.)

barackobama:

The news out of the BLS this morning: two years of growth. Hashtag: #progress.

barackobama:

The news out of the BLS this morning: two years of growth. Hashtag: #progress.

Congress Votes to Extend Payroll Tax Cuts and Jobless Benefits

With members of both parties expressing distaste at some of the particulars, Congress on Friday voted to extend payroll tax cuts and unemployment benefits and sent the legislation to President Obama, ending a contentious political and policy fight.

The vote in the House was 293 to 132 with Democrats, who are in the minority, carrying the proposal over the top with the acquiescence of almost as many Republicans. The Senate followed within minutes and approved the measure on a vote of 60 to 36.

WSJ disproves misleading conservative claim that "1.2M People Dropped out of Labor Force"

Here’s what happened: According to the Census Bureau, the civilian population grew by 1.5 million people in 2011. But the growth wasn’t distributed evenly. Most of the growth came among people 55 and older and, to a lesser degree, by people 16-24 years old. Both groups are less likely to work than people in their mid-20s to early 50s. So the share of the population that’s working is actually lower than previously believed. The changes in the Household Survey to the various measures had taken place over the years prior to 2010, but for simplicity’s sake, the BLS incorporates these changes into one month (which they clearly point out). Taking that into account, the employment-population ratio went up. The unemployment rate wasn’t affected.